Dietary and lifestyle guidelines that may assist in the management of PMT

  • A diet high in fresh fruit and vegetables
  • Essential fatty acids (fish, tuna, salmon, sardines) and lean protein sources are essential
  • Minimise intake of alcohol
  • Eliminate foods that increase oestrogen levels in the body and the liver’s ability to metabolise it. These include non-organic poultry, dairy, red meat, sugar, white flour and refined foods, methylxanthines (coffee, tea, chocolate, colas)
  • Cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower etc.) is important for the detoxification of hormones
  • If possible eat organic foods such as beets, carrots, yams, garlic, dark leafy greens, lemons and apples
  • Fibre facilitates the excretion of metabolised hormones and toxins
  • Minimise refined foods, as they deplete the body of magnesium and other essential nutrients, which are needed for normal hormone production
  • Correct nutritional deficiencies by supplementation (health professional)
  • Exercise and dietary restrictions (e.g. avoid salt, caffeine, alcohol, chocolate) are attempted first, as improvement may result. Stress reduction may also result in relief of symptoms
  • Reduce exposure to internal and external toxins (using a blood type diet) in conjunction with digestive repair and liver regeneration
  • Water intake: 4-6 glasses per day (herbal tea count as water)
  • Herbal Teas: rosehip, chamomile, dandelion, green tea, lemon grass, red clover
  • Add to your cereal 1-2 tspns linseeds, sunflower and sesame seeds. Ensure bowel functioning, if needed a herbal tonic can assist regularity or 1 dessert spoon of psyllium daily

Avoid or reduce:

  • Caffeine and saturated fats (both induce inflammatory prostaglandins that exacerbate symptoms)
  • Sugar (increases urinary excretion of magnesium, which is depleted in PMT sufferers)
  • Salt (fluid retention)
  • Non-organic dairy, meat and poultry (to decrease exogenous hormones and improve magnesium absorption)
  • Alcohol